SNAP 2018 toppers

  • Sourav Dutta

    Exam score : 99.99 percentile

    SNAP topper Sourav Dutta who scored 99.994 percentile in 2015 and opted for MBA at SIBM Pune, is a national level professional archer and was also a working professional before joining MBA at SIBM Pune. Sourav belongs to Jamshedpur. He has a consistent good academic record with 87.2%  in class 10; 81% in class 12 and 81% in his B.Tech which he completed from KIIT Bhubaneswar in 2013. Sourav Dutta had acquired a work experience of 17 months at Aricent, Gurgaon as Software engineer  before joining SIBM Pune.

     

     Apart from SNAP 2015 in which he scored 99.994 percentile, Sourav also appeared in CAT 2015, NMAT by GMAC, XAT 2016. He had admission option among SIBM Pune, NMIMS and a couple of new IIMs  but he opted for SIBM Pune.  

    For the benefit of MBA aspirants, MBAUniverse.com asked Sourav Dutta about his preparation strategy and advice to do well in MBA entrance exams. Details follow:

     

    Q. What was your preparation strategy for SNAP?
    A.
    Last year I missed cut-offs by very small margins so I was very determined to prepare again this year and get through. I had a huge task of managing my professional sports career, job and preparation at the same time. But when you aspire to study management we need to manage right from the start. So I joined the evening classes at TIME Gurgaon where I was working. After the job hours, I devoted 2 hours to classroom session and then practiced in the morning.

     

    I knew I lacked in quant and English passages, so I started from the first day.

     

    I solved last 10 year questions on quant and timed myself each time. I also solved the sectional tests and the questions in the study booklets and discussed the wrong questions every week. I also gave the mocks and discussed and analysed each performance and changed the strategy as and when needed.

     

    Q. How did you prepare for each section in SNAP? What study materials and books did you use?
    A.
    I used the coaching institute study materials only. I was weak at the English passages and a little slow in the quantitative aptitude section. So I solved a lot of sectional tests for both these sections and also solved last 10 years question papers for these two sections which helped me a lot. I also took feedback from the mentors I got at the coaching institute to analyse my mock performance and what should be my strategy for each exam according to my performance.  

     

    Q. Was there any particular section that you were weak at? How did you overcome this challenge?
    A.
    Yes, I was weak at English comprehension; in fact I’m still not very good at it. I never had the habit of reading books or reading newspaper which made it difficult for me to read big passages. I used to feel bored or lose the data I read till then. But whenever I solved the study materials I used to time myself few minutes less and tried to complete those passages. Then, I started solving last 10 years question paper mainly passages. I also started reading news and hearing a lot of debates. I also started writing answers in different forums like quora which helped too.

     

    Q.  How can candidates use Mock tests better? What is your advice?
    A.
    I have always followed GP’s simple rule that the time we devote in taking mocks should be equal to the time we use to analyse them. Taking mocks is just the first step but when we go through our strategy and what we lack,  shows the areas of strengths and weakness which help us leave questions on the D-day. As we have limited amount of time we have to attempt questions, which we will hopefully go on to solve and this information can be retrieved only by analysis of our mock performance.

     

    Q. Did you go to offline coaching centre? What role does a coaching centre play?
    A.
    Yes, I went to TIME Gurgaon and joined the swift batch of 3 months. I prepared for MBA entrance exams along with job so it was really helpful when it came to the classroom experience. It gave a lot of exposure and the basics were brushed up. It also bought some practice time for me. The mocks were very helpful as it showed where I stood in the national level among all aspirants.

     

    Q. Other than SNAP, which exam did you appear?
    A.
    Other than SNAP, I appeared in CAT, XAT, TISSNET, NMAT and the IIFT exam. 

     

    Q. Which institutes did you apply for admission?  
    A.
    For SNAP, I applied for only SIBM Pune and SCMHRD.

     

    Q. Please share your strategy for the SNAP Day. What was your last-minute preparation? How did you plan your SNAP test taking?
    A.
    I was very clear on what my strength was and which section I was attempting and how much time I had to devote on each section. I also had no preconceived cut-offs score and wanted to take up each question and solve and move forward. As you can’t do much about the cut-offs as it purely depends on others performance so it’s useless to worry about it. I had given good 5-6 mocks and was confident. But on the exam day there was a surprise when I saw the paper it was really very difficult. So first thing I knew was that the GK was the section that would make the difference. I started with my strongest section which was reasoning and then moved on to GK, followed by English and quant. No last minute preparation strategy as such. I relaxed the day before the exam and spent happy time with my family.

     

    Q. Which B-school you decided upon and why? 
    A.
    I had an option between SIBM Pune, NMIMS and a couple of new IIM’s. I decided to go for SIBM Pune, because they not only believe in academics but also support extra-curricular activities which I think is really important in shaping our personality. I also selected SIBM Pune as it was the oldest of the three and because of the brand value of Symbiosis. I saw the recent achievements of students and they have been winning national competitions and were improving each year.

     

    Q. Any message you would like to share with the candidates preparing for SNAP?
    A.
    Yes, first of all be very well versed with the format of the exam and be prepared for surprises. Don’t have any preconception about the number of questions you want to attempt as the cut-offs purely depend on the paper difficulty.

     

    In 2016 the cut-off was as low as 78 marks due to a difficult reasoning section whereas the cut-offs for 2015 was more than 100. So be prepared and take decisions carefully. Also take a few mocks, apart from national level mocks conducted by coaching institutes, Coffee with SIBM mocks also help a lot. Manage time well and spend time in all the sections. Also keep fighting till the end one question can sail you through. 

  • Akshay Kumar Singh

    Exam score : 99.97 percentile

    Akshay hails from Purnea Bihar. He is a B.E in Mechanical Engineering and had a work experience of 6 months before joining MBA at SIBM Pune after scoring 99.97 percentile in SNAP 2015. He has great interest in Playing cricket, watching Bollywood Movies, Listening to music. His source of inspiration is his family.  

    My exam prep strategy, experience & Advice

    For the benefit of MBA aspirants, MBAUniverse.com asked Akshay Kumar Singh about his preparation strategy and advice to do well in MBA entrance exams. Details follow:

     

    Q. What was your preparation strategy for SNAP?

     

    A. My preparation strategy was simple. I wanted to make sure that I spent maximum time on sections where I lagged behind. I knew Quants and Logical were those sections and hence I divided my time accordingly.

     

    I also focused on General Knowledge section as the best thing with this section is either you know the answer or you don’t know the answer. Like the other 3 sections where even after spending time you are not sure about the answer, the GK section consumes less time. Other than this I kept giving mock tests which helped me analyse my preparations closely.

     

    Q.  How did you prepare for each section in SNAP? What study materials and books did you use?

     

    A. I would say that keeping things simple is the best strategy followed for any exam preparation. I divided time for each section based on my strengths and weaknesses and strictly followed them. 

     

    I was little unclear with the basics so I started with Quantitative Aptitude by RS Agarwal. After brushing up the basics, I moved to study materials of IMS and TIME. I spent a lot of time on these study materials as they were quite diverse and would cover questions from most of the books. I also referred to Arun Sharma’s book for Quantitave Aptitude and Logical Reasoning. For the General Knowledge, I referred Manorama Year Book and of course, the internet was also of great use.

     

    Q. Was there any particular section that you were weak at? How did you overcome this challenge?

     

    A. Yes, I was weak at Logical Reasoning and Quantitative Aptitude.  As I started preparation, I realized that my basics were not that clear. There was no use of just rushing and solving questions as I was getting stuck in every second question. Then I decided to dedicate some time brushing my basics, went back to textbooks of school and stared solving RS Agarwal. I spent major chunk of time preparing for these two sections as I needed improvement on them. I took it in phases and I knew it would happen and after about a month it started getting better.

     

    Q. How can candidates use Mock tests better? What is your advice?

     

    A. Mock tests are very useful, at least for me it was. It helped me analyse my performance. When preparing for these kind of exams, we need some performance measure. When I started taking mock tests, although I was able to solve the questions but the speed was very poor. By taking mock tests repeatedly, I realized how to approach different questions. I was clear about the time I had to spend on each section.

     

    My advice would be to take mock tests but don’t start it too early. Start taking it seriously 2-3 months before the exam and stop it before at least 10 days of the examination, that’s what I did. Analyse it closely enough to identify your weakness and to prepare a strategy and approach for the D-day.

     

    Q. Did you go to offline coaching centre? What role does a coaching centre play?

     

    A. I did go to the offline coaching centre but again I stopped it for some days as I was not able to cope up with their speed. I needed my own time to solve a silly question which I was not getting there and that would lower my confidence. After I matched their level, I went there for some more classes. But of course their study material has lot to offer.

     

    I would say that offline coaching centre offers differently to every individual. It depends on what you are comfortable with. It obviously provides you that competitive environment and many short tricks by many experienced faculties. But only word of caution, please brush up your basics and then go for the coaching centres.

     

    Q. Other than SNAP, which exam did you appear?

     

    A. Other than SNAP, I appeared in NMAT. 

     

    Q. Which institutes did you apply for admission?  

     

    A. I applied to SIBM – Pune, NMIMS – Mumbai, SCMHRD – Pune, SIBM – Bangalore, SIIB – Pune, NMIMS – Bangalore and a few more

     

    Q. Please share your strategy for the SNAP Day. What was your last-minute preparation? How did you plan your SNAP test taking?

     

    A. I personally don’t believe in last minute preparation. I just had small notes of important points which I revised the night before the SNAP and then had a nice sleep of 8 hours as I wanted my anxiety levels to be as low as possible and remain calm.

     

    I started with GK section and then moved on to Quant section followed by Logical Reasoning.

     

    Q. Which B-school you decided upon and why? 

     

    A. I chose SIBM Pune and there have to be numerous reasons for selecting it. It carries behind a legacy of about 40 years and has been amongst the Top MBA colleges of India consistently.

     

    I was also impressed with the batch size of the college and I would say that it has also played a major role in deciding upon. I thought that the relatively smaller batch size would provide me enough opportunities and good learning experience during my MBA. Last but not the least, I would be lying if I don’t say that campus is also one of the motivator for the same, it was like icing on the cake.

     

    Q. Any message you would like to share with the candidates preparing for SNAP?

     

    A. Just be calm and work on your weaknesses. Approach matters and hence remain positive.

  • Madhur Mehta

    Exam score : 99.23 percentile

    An inspiration for non engineers and for Symbiosis B-school aspirants, Madhur Mehta has done his Bachelors in Pharmacy. He is a consistent performer. He scored 88.31% in 10th Std; 76.85% in 12th Std and 7.62 CPI in B.Pharma.  Madhur not only cracked SNAP 2016 with 99.23 percentile but also scored 96.65 percentile in CAT 2016; 214 in NMAT 2016 and 99 percentile in MICAT. Despite receiving calls from other B-schools, he preferred Symbiosis Pune as it was his dream B-school.

     

    Madhur is a fresher and got SIBM Pune immediately after his bachelors. He belongs to Bhuj (Kutch) in Gujarat. Madhur attributes his success to his father who has been his inspiration. He loves playing Basketball, Writing and Acting.

    My exam prep strategy, experience & Advice:

    For the benefit of MBA aspirants, MBAUniverse.com asked Madhur Mehta about his preparation strategy and advice to do well in MBA entrance exams. Details follow:

     

    What was your preparation strategy for SNAP 2016?
    I started off with basic preparation of vocabulary, fundamental Mathematics, and Logical Reasoning Questions. I made sure that every day I’ll go through questions from each section. Since I am a fresher; it was difficult in the beginning to continue doing so while pursuing graduation, but gradually I got a hang of it. I started practicing more and more each day and then got addicted to such aptitude questions.

     

    I started relating about many things by associating it to the aptitude based questions, be it my Bacherlors of Pharmacy subject’s technical terms which enhanced my vocabulary, or at a hangout place with friends, doing the final tally of money regarding who is supposed to pay how much. Such smaller things create difference and added value to my understanding of mock exams. Apart from regularly practicing, which I consider is must; I also took enough mock exams to know the areas of improvement and enhance my performance.

     

    How did you prepare for each section English, Quant, DI, Reasoning, GK? What study materials and books did you use? 

    For SNAP 2016, I went for quiz section first. As approaching it, would take up very less time, and many questions from the same section could be attempted.

     

    After that, I went for Quant, Reasoning, DI and then Verbal. Since, Verbal was my strongest section, I made sure to attempt only those questions from Quant and Reasoning which I am very sure of so that I can give enough time to Verbal.

     

    Preparation for Quant: I picked up one chapter a day and completed it that day itself including solving of the doubts. Practicing it more and more got me a better position of knowing that which questions should I take head on and which ones to leave.

     

    For verbal: I solved at least 5 RCs a day and revised few vocabulary words. Since I have a reading habit, it was really helpful in other sections of Grammar which could be done many times by instinct.

     

    For DI: Again, as clichéd as it would sound, I used to take up 3-4 sets of DI and set a timer to complete them daily. Later, I used to review my performance and maintained a graph of my scores.

    For GK: As in our snap guidelines, it was mentioned that current affairs of the last two years were to be asked, I went through the magazines of past two years, major headlines and read about them.

    Study material used:  I went to Endeavor Coaching Classes in Ahmedabad, so most of the reading material I used was theirs.

     

    Was there any particular section that you were weak at? How did you overcome this challenge?

    As I had taken up Biology after 10th standard, I was not at all in touch with Quant questions as I prolonged my education in Bachelors of Pharmacy. So, Quant being my weakest section, I started spending more of my attention and time on solving those questions.

     

    Later, I understood that it’s not about solving difficult questions, it’s all about scouting and solving the ones you know better in the limited span of time. After applying this strategy, I saw an increase in my Mock SNAP score and it helped me in my SNAP exam as well.

     

    How can candidates use Mock tests better? What is your advice?
    I would advise everyone to MUST give the mock tests. I can’t possibly stress it more. Mock tests help you understand where you have gone wrong and how much you can improve from it. You would understand your areas of improvement, and your better time allocation. When you realise later that you have missed on easier questions on solving the difficult ones, it’s always disappointing. Mock tests, help us realize which questions are best to enter and take it head on and which ones are worth leaving.

     

    Did you go to offline coaching centre? What role does a coaching centre play?

    Yes, I went to Endeavor Coaching classes, Ahmedabad. I believe they were the ones who equipped me with all the tools to fight this battle out. They not only provided the materials but also guided us the tricks and ticks about how to go about each section and their questions. They made us give so many mock tests that we got used to them. They helped us with GD and PI and helped us enter our desired B-school.

     

    Other than SNAP, which exam did you appear?

    I appeared for CAT, XAT, NMAT, MICAT other than SNAP.

     

    Which institutes did you apply for admission?

    I applied for NMIMS, SIBM Pune, SCMHRD and MICA for admission.

     

    Please share your strategy for the SNAP Day. What was your last-minute preparation? How did you plan your SNAP test taking?

    My strategy for the SNAP day was to keep it simple and be relaxed. I did not want to try anything new on that day. I applied the same strategy that I used to apply during mocks. On that day, to keep the insulin and glucose level high during an afternoon exams, I just made sure that I had an Ice-cream before I entered in.

     
    Which B-school you decided upon and why?

    I decided upon SIBM Pune for various reasons.

    1. The placements of SIBM records were the best of the lot I had gotten offers from.
    2. Its Alumni base is by far the Strongest and the most looked upon to connect amongst any other B-schools.
    3. Its crowd is so diverse that one gets to have the best of the peer bonding experience.
    4. To be a part of amazing Councils where you get to organize and be a part of Competitions which has Pan India reach.
    5. And lastly, the amazing campus of SIBM Pune would melt anyone’s heart and would make you want to stay here for a minimum of two years.

     

    Any message you would like to share with the candidates preparing for SNAP. 

    Prepare regularly for all the sections, do not stress much on the day of the SNAP examination, be thorough with all the basics and be relevant with the current affairs. A proper approach and strategy of your own which fits you the best would help you crack SNAP exam and a chance to be a part of this esteemed college and an awesome campus life.

  • Rajat Tomar

    Exam score : 98.10 percentile

    Rajat Tomar has done B.Tech in Mechanical Engg. from HBTI Kanpur and is now pursuing PGDRM from IRMA. He has a Work Experience of around 2 years in United Breweries Ltd. Rajat belongs to Baraut, Uttar Pradesh. His father is a teacher in primary school and his mother is a house-wife.

     

    Determined to crack CAT with high percentile, Rajat appeared in CAT exam and scored 92.5 percentile. 

     

    He has interest in Reading and Analyzing World Politics, Spirituality, Cricket, Badminton.